The History Of The Card Game

There are players who are immediately passionate about the game and its rules and who are not interested in the history of the evolution of the game, but there are also those who like to learn and know the history of the game they are playing. it is for this reason that many online casinos and portals such as CasinoOnlineItalia feature articles on the history of various casino games, including card games such as blackjack and baccarat . However, it is not easy to find articles on the history of card games, but in this we will try to trace the salient moments of their evolution.

Historians have no doubt that the card game originated in China. There are references to the card game in the history of the Chinese royal family as early as the ninth century. This ancient Chinese game featured four suits, and generally the numbers 2 to 9 for each suit. The silk road merchants brought this game from China to India, the Middle East and Egypt. In India the game has evolved differently, developing more than four suits. The card game as we know it today developed in Egypt around the 12th century.

In Egypt the game of cards was used practiced during the regime of Mamluk Sultans, and the deck that was used is known today as the Mameluke deck. This deck had 52 cards, in four suits of 13 cards each. The suits were sticks, coins, swords and cups. Each suit had ten numbered cards, identified by the number and symbol of the suit, and three court cards called King, Vice King and Under Vice. The figures featured abstract designs, not people.

The earliest references to card games in Europe are found in Spain in 1371. After that, references were found throughout Europe.

The first playing cards were hand made, woodblocked, and subsequently engraved. The printed cards we know today came much later. There were similarities and differences between the different European locations. The cards as we know them today, with spades, hearts, diamonds and clubs, originated in France towards the end of the 15th century. They were soon picked up from various locations across Europe, the last to accept the French system was England, thus imposing it as a universal system. Originally the figures were called King, Knight and infantryman, later the Queen replaced the knight.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.